How to Clean a Cast Iron Grill Griddle

Emeril Cast Iron Grill Griddle

I love using the Emeril cast iron griddle grill to cook steak, chicken breasts and perfect hamburgers on the stove, to get those grill marks like in a restaurant, but I hate cleaning it.

If you search the internet for methods how to clean a cast iron grill griddle, you will find that most methods include scrubbing with a brillo pad or applying a cleaner then scrubbing with a brillo type pad, and using some elbow grease to scrape off the baked on grease, oil, fat, etc.  This is how I used to clean our Emeril Cast Iron Grill, and the way most people recommend cleaning cast iron cookware.  Doesn’t sound like too much fun, does it?
These two methods for How to Clean a Cast Iron Grill Griddle will make the job of cleaning your cast iron grill griddle a snap, and will eliminate the endless scrubbing and hard work to remove baked on food, oil, and grease.

Season your Cast Iron Griddle Grill

 

The first easy method to clean a cast iron grill griddle is to season your cast iron grill, which will bake on a non-stick coating of fat so it will perform like a Teflon-coated non stick skillet without the dangers of the PFOA or PTFE found in most nonstick cookware.  I have also found even with my cast iron grill, which was seasoned at the factory, that the seasoning process and quality of oils used are low quality and you may find food still sticks, so I recommend reseasoning your new grill.  While the oils are baked on during seasoning, they do not provide a permanent non-stick coating like enameled cast iron.  Using and washing your cast iron cookware will wear away the oils over time, so depending on the amount of use you will need to season your cast iron grill when you notice food beginning to stick to your cast iron grill griddle.  Also, if you keep a kosher home you will want to buy a bare cast iron grill that has not been seasoned at the factory, and season it yourself, since the oils used may not be certified kosher.

 

 

Coat the Grill with Kosher Salt

 

I learned how to clean a cast iron grill griddle while watching a cooking show.  This process takes about 10 minutes.

Generously sprinkle course kosher salt on the grooves of your cast iron griddle grill before cooking, so that the bottom of the grooves are white so you know you have enough salt to absorb fat, grease and blood.   Do not use table salt on the grill side, since the salt crystals are too small and will not absorb the oil, fat and grease.  You do not need to use salt on the griddle side. For this smooth cooking surface perfect for pancakes, I use a good coating of olive oil, which keeps food from sticking.

Once the grill has cooled to the touch, apply dish soap to the brillo pad or scrub brush, and you will find that large chunks of the hardened kosher salt will break off, taking most of the food particles and fat with it.  This takes away about 90% of the baked on food or grease, and leaves small pieces or food, oil or grease to be removed.

Now using your brillo pad or scrub brush, you can easily remove the remaining pieces of the food and grease with minimal effort, and your cast iron grill is clean and ready to be used again.

Now you know How to Clean a Cast Iron Grill Griddle without spending hours scrubbing your cast iron grill griddle.

 

Ken Weiss

Ken Weiss is a blogger and stay at home dad.He is the founder of the-cookingpot.com, a cooking blog for stay at home dads, that offers cookware reviews, easy recipes and tips on how to make money with a blog.

9 Comments »

  1. LondonHelp July 15, 2016 at 9:49 PM - Reply

    Ha! I would have never thought about that thing with the kosher salt. Nice tip, thanks!

  2. Michael May 27, 2016 at 1:40 AM - Reply

    Ha! I would have never thought about that thing with the kosher salt. Nice tip, thanks!
    Michael recently posted…6 Steps to Clean Your Grill Fast and EasyMy Profile

  3. Donna October 26, 2015 at 2:15 PM - Reply

    It seems when I clean my Emeril stovetop grill the seasoning comes off. What’s the best way to re-season the grill?

    • Ken Weiss October 27, 2015 at 8:08 AM - Reply

      Hi Donna,

      Thanks for the comment. Even though the Emeril stovetop cast iron grill comes pre-seasoned, over time and with regular use and cleaning, the seasoning wears off and you will need to re-season any cast iron skillet.

      Here’s an article I wrote on how to season a cast iron skillet. https://the-cookingpot.com/how-to-season-a-cast-iron-skillet/

      I hope this helps.

      Ken
      the-cookingpot.com

  4. Linda July 16, 2014 at 7:37 AM - Reply

    This does NOT instruct how to CLEAN a grill. It’s all about AVOIDING the necessity to clean it. This belongs under the heading – The Importance of Seasoning Your Cast Iron Grill.

    • Ken July 21, 2014 at 12:49 PM - Reply

      Hi Linda, thanks for your message, but I think you missed the point of my post. If you search the internet for methods to clean a cast iron grill/griddle, you will find that most methods include scrubbing with a brillo pad or apply salt or baking soda and scrubbing with a brillo type pad, and using some elbow grease to scrape off the baked on grease, oil, fat, etc. This is how I used to clean our Emeril Cast Iron Grill, and the way most people recommend cleaning cast iron cookware. Doesn’t sound like too much fun.

      I discovered that if you add kosher salt before you cook, the salt absorbs the grease, fat, oil etc., and then with a scrub brush (no brillo pad or steel wool needed), as the salt is scrubbed off it takes 90% of the gook with it, and the rest comes off with light to moderate scrubbing. You can use baking soda to help remove the rest of the baked on food particles. My goal is to help you clean your grill without scrubbing.

      Happy Cooking, Ken

  5. Joanne March 13, 2014 at 8:56 AM - Reply

    Hi! Does the salt not stick to the food? Do you need to allow the salt to preheat on the grill? or put it on just before adding the food? I’d love additional detail how you use this method. Thank you!

    • Ken March 13, 2014 at 12:59 PM - Reply

      Hi Joanne, Thanks for a great comment. Since the salt is in the grooves of the grill and the food sits on top of the grill slits, the salt does not touch the food. I use course Kosher salt on my Emeril grill/griddle, and put enough to cover the bottom of the grill, so I see all white. You don’t need so much salt that it completely fills in the grooves to the point it is touching the food. You generally just need enough to cover the bottom, but you can experiment to find the right amount of salt for your needs. Remember to use course Kosher salt and not table salt. Table salt does not work to absorb grease, fat or blood droppings like Kosher salt does.

      I put the salt in before the grill heats up just to prevent burns since the grill will get pretty hot. The purpose of the salt is to absorb the drippings and is not for cooking or to flavor the food, so you can put it in when the grill is heating up or just before putting on the food. I don’t use salt on the griddle side. I also like to put a layer of olive oil on the top of the grill, as I find this helps chicken and burgers from sticking.

      For cleaning, I wait until the grill completely cools down. The salt will harden a bit, which makes cleaning super easy, since the salt and grease comes off in chunks. I use a course kitchen cleaning brush, which gets all the salt mess off more easily than using a sponge.

      Hope this helps.

      Regards, Ken

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